Your Screenwriter Hasn't Been Himself Lately

I don't know, man.

midmarauder:

Hughes Talks about The Breakfast Club and how it was made

damienhirstworld:

Leviathan, 2006 - 2013
by Damien Hirst 
Hirst acquired this 6.8 metre-long basking shark with the assistance of London’s Natural History Museum, after it was found washed up on a Cornish beach. Stating the shark looked like a ‘monster from the deep’, Hirst titled the work after the mythical sea creature depicted in the Hebrew Bible and Christian Old Testament. Leviathan is also a reference to the 17th century British theoretician Thomas Hobbes’ work of social contract theory. As much as a physical monster, Hirst’s ‘Levitathan’ can be interpreted as a reference to the darkness inside the mind of man.

damienhirstworld:

Leviathan, 2006 - 2013

by Damien Hirst 

Hirst acquired this 6.8 metre-long basking shark with the assistance of London’s Natural History Museum, after it was found washed up on a Cornish beach. Stating the shark looked like a ‘monster from the deep’, Hirst titled the work after the mythical sea creature depicted in the Hebrew Bible and Christian Old Testament. Leviathan is also a reference to the 17th century British theoretician Thomas Hobbes’ work of social contract theory. As much as a physical monster, Hirst’s ‘Levitathan’ can be interpreted as a reference to the darkness inside the mind of man.

(via bleachnoir)

sirmitchell:

justinishmael:

I had Jason Edmiston answer my question as to “What did the hunting photo look like in Planet of the Apes?” 

I think he nailed it!

Going to see RISE OF THE APES in a few hours. So excited!

My favorite Jason Edmiston piece. 


SAGA #24 story: BRIAN K. VAUGHAN  art / cover: FIONA STAPLES  OCTOBER 27 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $2.99  Hey, it’s The Brand and Sweet Boy!

SAGA #24
story: BRIAN K. VAUGHAN
art / cover: FIONA STAPLES

OCTOBER 27 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $2.99 


Hey, it’s The Brand and Sweet Boy!

(Source: fyeahsaga)

spasmoacapulco :

VIEW THE MASTER

"The View-Master viewer is in the form of a pair of binoculars, in which the user insert a notched disk card, with 7 pairs of slides. Each eye viewing a pair of separate images, they may be the same to form a single two-dimensional image, or may present the same scene from a slightly different angle, and form a relief image.

The user activates a trigger on the side of the viewer to rotate the disc and move from one shot to another, such a reverse camera. It is necessary to look through the camera at a light source, so that the images are properly visible. “

(via daltonjamesrose)

Anonymous asked: Pardon me if I'm the 8000th person to ask this one, but how do writers submit material for BL table read consideration? The conventional read, rate and feature route?

This is a perfect question for Franklin Leonard. I will forward this onto him and let him respond!

I’M GOING TO KILL EVERYONE: The Table Read

A couple of weeks ago, Franklin at the Black List emailed me and asked if I had any new scripts I’d be interested in doing a small, private table read of. I had just finished this script, and this past Monday we had the table read.

You guys, it was a total blast. 

Here’s the release from the Black List about it:

July 8, 2014 (Los Angeles) – Last night, the Black List launched a private screenplay reading series with Brian Duffield’s I AM GOING TO KILL EVERYONE. Cast by Deborah Aquila and Lisa Zagoria with actors from the Aquila Morong studio as all future readings will be, last night’s event was the first in a new series designed to allow working screenwriters to privately workshop in-progress original material with the benefit of hearing it performed by professional actors for an invite-only audience of their choice and at no cost to them.

I’M GOING TO KILL EVERYONE is a dark action comedy that answers the immortal question of what happens when a serial killer for hire (Joe Holt), a psychopath (Marianna Palka), a hipster (Elisha Yaffe), a robot (Joel Bryant) and a pig (no one, because it’s a pig) go on a road trip and listen to Tori Amos. Lots of people die, like the title warns you. Mandy May and Hal Ozsan rounded out the cast.

Duffield, screenwriter of upcoming films INSURGENT and JANE GOT A GUN, said of the experience, “In an industry where writers are often treated as disposable, Franklin and the Black List stand alone in cherishing the writer’s voice and work. I was honored to have been able to test-run a brand new script with Lisa and Deb’s perfectly cast actors, and I could not be happier with how it went. I left the table read eager to go home and write more scripts, which is perhaps the greatest compliment I can pay an already great organization and event.”

Lisa and Deb added, “We were so pleased to work together with the Black List again to celebrate great writing. Brian wrote a unique and fun script, that was even more hilarious and nuanced when coupled with stellar actors. Work shopping a script-in-progress is a great way for the writer to hear what works and what might not, and for actors to stretch their muscles and play around with different characters that they may not typically have the opportunity to play.”

The Black List is currently accepting submissions for the Works in Progress series. Scripts should be that which the writer has an eagerness to workshop with an eye toward an immediate rewrite. Any WGA members (East or West) interested in submitting their script for a potential read can do so by emailing WIP@blcklst.com with a brief description of the script, why the author wishes to have it read, and who they’d like in their audience to help workshop the script. Writers should also have at least one script listed in the Black List’s screenplay database (a free service for all WGAe, WGAw, and WGGB members).

“The Black List has always been about highlighting and supporting ambitious storytelling, and this is a particularly exciting platform where we’ll do it,” said Black List founder Franklin Leonard. “I’M GOING TO KILL EVERYONE is the kind of script that’s perfect for this. Unorthodox, challenging, and absolutely bursting with potential as a feature film. This is the first of many, and we look forward to hearing from writers about material to which they’d like to give similar treatment. Seriously, get in touch.”

Our hero.